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Eamon Joseph O'Brien (September 10, 1915 – May 9, 1985) was an American actor. In a career spanning nearly four decades, he received an Academy Award, two Golden Globe Awards, and two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. One of the most respected character actors of American cinema, O'Brien gained critical acclaim for his roles in The Barefoot Contessa (1954) and Seven Days in May (1964), the former of which won him an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor, the latter of which he received a nomination in the same category. (1950), The Hitch-Hiker (1953), Julius Caesar (1953), 1984 (1956), The Girl Can't Help It (1956), The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962), Fantastic Voyage (1966), The Wild Bunch (1969), and The Other Side of the Wind (2018). O'Brien put on magic shows for children in his neighborhood with coaching from a neighbor, Harry Houdini. His other notable films include The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939), The Killers (1946), A Double Life (1947), White Heat (1949), D. He performed under the title, "Neirbo the Great" ("neirbo" being "O'Brien" spelled backwards). An aunt who taught high school English and speech took him to the theatre from an early age and he developed an interest in acting. O'Brien studied for two years under such teachers as Sanford Meisner; his classmates included Betty Garrett. He said, "It was simply the best training in the world for a young actor, singer or dancer." He added, "What these teachers encouraged above all was getting your tools ready – your body, your voice, your speech." He played a grave digger in Hamlet, went on tour with Parnell, then appeared in Maxwell Anderson's The Star Wagon, starring Lillian Gish and Burgess Meredith. In 1940 he appeared with Ruth Chatterton in John Van Druten's Leave Her to Heaven on Broadway. Twelve years later he appeared in the same writer's I've Got Sixpence. O'Brien's theatre work attracted the attention of Pandro Berman at RKO, who offered him a role as the romantic lead in The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939). He returned to Broadway to play Mercutio opposite Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh in Romeo and Juliet. His roles included A Girl, a Guy, and a Gob (1941) and Parachute Battalion (1941). Army Air Forces and appeared in the Air Forces' Broadway play Winged Victory by Moss Hart. The latter starred Nancy Kelly whom O'Brien would later marry, although the union lasted less than a year. He appeared alongside Red Buttons, Karl Malden, Kevin Mc Carthy, Gary Merrill, Barry Nelson, and Martin Ritt. O'Brien made Obliging Young Lady with Eve Arden, and Powder Town. When the play was filmed in 1944, O'Brien reprised his stage performance, co-starring with Judy Holliday. In May 1942, Universal bought out his contract with RKO so he could appear opposite Deanna Durbin in The Amazing Mrs. He toured in the production for two years, appearing alongside a young Mario Lanza. In 1948, O'Brien signed a long-term contract with Warner Bros., who cast him in the screen version of Lillian Hellman's Another Part of the Forest. This starred Fredric March, who also appeared with O'Brien in An Act of Murder (1948). He was then cast as the undercover police officer in White Heat (1949) opposite James Cagney. "He [Cagney] said he had only one rule," O'Brien noted. "He would tap his heart and he would say, "Play it from here, kid." He always did and I believe it's the best rule for any performer. He could play a scene 90 ways and never repeat himself. I try to do this whenever possible." In 1949, 3,147 members of the Young Women's League of America, a national charitable organisation of spinsters, voted that O'Brien had more "male magnetism" than any other man in America today. "All women adore ruggedness," said organisation President Shirley Connolly. "Edmund O'Brien's magnetic appearance and personality most fully stir women's imaginative impulses. We're all agreed that he has more male magnetism than any of the 60,000,000 men in the United States today. According to TCM, "In the early '50s, O'Brien started struggling with his weight, which could change significantly between films. (Runners up were Ezio Pinza, William O'Dwyer and Doak Walker.) Following an appearance in Backfire (shot in 1948 but not released until 1950), his contract with Warner Bros. O'Brien then made one of his most famous movies, D. A., where he plays a man investigating his own murder. He had no problems if that relegated him to character roles, but for a few years, "it was hard to come by anything really first rate." "The funny thing about Hollywood is that they are interested in having you do one thing and do it well and do it ever after," said O'Brien. "That's the sad thing about being a leading man – while the rewards may be great in fame and finances, it becomes monotonous for an actor. O'Brien worked heavily in television, on such shows as Pulitzer Prize Playhouse, Lux Video Theatre and Schlitz Playhouse of Stars. O'Brien appeared extensively in television, including the 1957 live 90-minute broadcast on Playhouse 90 of The Comedian, a drama written by Rod Serling and directed by John Frankenheimer in which Mickey Rooney portrayed a television comedian while O'Brien played a writer driven to the brink of insanity. But you just put a gun in your hands and run through the streets during cops and robbers and you're all set." O'Brien had roles on many television series, including an appearance on Target: The Corruptors! I think that's why some of the people who are continually playing themselves are not happy." He made some notable movies including two for Ida Lupino, The Hitch-Hiker and The Bigamist. In 1958 he directed and starred in a TV drama written by his brother, "The Town That Slept With the Lights On", about two Lancaster murders that so frightened the community that residents began sleeping with their lights on. good picture, good cast, but no good at the box office . , The Eleventh Hour, Breaking Point and Mission: Impossible. From 1959–60 O'Brien portrayed the title role in the syndicated crime drama Johnny Midnight, about a New York City actor-turned-private detective. I tried non-crime films like Another Part of the Forest . O'Brien walked off the set of The Last Voyage in protest at safety issues during the shoot. The producers refused to cast him unless he shed at least 50 pounds, so he went on a crash vegetarian diet and quit drinking. He later came back and found out he had been written out of the film. "I seldom get very far away from crime," he recalled. He was cast as a reporter in Lawrence of Arabia (1962), but had a heart attack during filming and was replaced by Arthur Kennedy. O'Brien recovered to direct his first feature Man-Trap (1961) and appeared opposite Henry Fonda in The Longest Day (1962). He continued to receive good roles: The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962) and The Birdman of Alcatraz (1962). In the mid-'60s O'Brien co-starred with Roger Mobley and Harvey Korman in the "Gallegher" episodes of NBC's Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color. From 1963–65 he co-starred in the NBC legal drama Sam Benedict. O'Brien had a choice role in Seven Days in May (1964) which saw him receive a second Oscar nomination. "I've never made any kind of personality success," he admitted in a 1963 interview. "People never say 'that's an Eddie O'Brien part.' They say, 'That's a part Eddie O'Brien can play.' " ""I'd like to be able to say something important," he added. "To say something to people about their relationship with each other. If it touches just one guy, helps illustrate some points of view about living, then you've accomplished something." O'Brien worked steadily throughout the late 1960s and early 1970s. However his memory problems were beginning to take their toll. A heart attack meant he had to drop out of The Glass Bottom Boat (1966). "It would be awfully hard to do a series again," he said in a 1971 interview. They don't have much of a chance against the movies." His last works, both in 1974, were an episode of the television series Police Story and main role in the film 99 and 44/100% Dead. In 1957 O'Brien recorded a spoken-word album of The Red Badge of Courage (Caedmon TC 1040). Billboard said, "Edmond O'Brien brings intensity in the narrative portions and successfully impersonates the varied characters in dialog." In the late 1970s, O'Brien fell ill with Alzheimer's disease. We didn't know, because for years he'd been sleeping with all his clothes on. In a 1983 interview, his daughter Maria remembers seeing her father in a straitjacket at a Veterans' Hospital: "He was screaming. We saw him a little later and he was walking around like all the other lost souls there." For his contribution to the motion picture industry, Edmond O'Brien has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1725 Vine Street, and a second star at 6523 Hollywood Blvd. Eamon Joseph O'Brien (September 10, 1915 – May 9, 1985) was an American actor. In a career spanning nearly four decades, he received an Academy Award, two Golden Globe Awards, and two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. One of the most respected character actors of American cinema, O'Brien gained critical acclaim for his roles in The Barefoot Contessa (1954) and Seven Days in May (1964), the former of which won him an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor, the latter of which he received a nomination in the same category. (1950), The Hitch-Hiker (1953), Julius Caesar (1953), 1984 (1956), The Girl Can't Help It (1956), The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962), Fantastic Voyage (1966), The Wild Bunch (1969), and The Other Side of the Wind (2018). O'Brien put on magic shows for children in his neighborhood with coaching from a neighbor, Harry Houdini. His other notable films include The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939), The Killers (1946), A Double Life (1947), White Heat (1949), D. He performed under the title, "Neirbo the Great" ("neirbo" being "O'Brien" spelled backwards). An aunt who taught high school English and speech took him to the theatre from an early age and he developed an interest in acting. O'Brien studied for two years under such teachers as Sanford Meisner; his classmates included Betty Garrett. He said, "It was simply the best training in the world for a young actor, singer or dancer." He added, "What these teachers encouraged above all was getting your tools ready – your body, your voice, your speech." He played a grave digger in Hamlet, went on tour with Parnell, then appeared in Maxwell Anderson's The Star Wagon, starring Lillian Gish and Burgess Meredith. In 1940 he appeared with Ruth Chatterton in John Van Druten's Leave Her to Heaven on Broadway. Twelve years later he appeared in the same writer's I've Got Sixpence. O'Brien's theatre work attracted the attention of Pandro Berman at RKO, who offered him a role as the romantic lead in The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939). He returned to Broadway to play Mercutio opposite Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh in Romeo and Juliet. His roles included A Girl, a Guy, and a Gob (1941) and Parachute Battalion (1941). Army Air Forces and appeared in the Air Forces' Broadway play Winged Victory by Moss Hart. The latter starred Nancy Kelly whom O'Brien would later marry, although the union lasted less than a year. He appeared alongside Red Buttons, Karl Malden, Kevin Mc Carthy, Gary Merrill, Barry Nelson, and Martin Ritt. O'Brien made Obliging Young Lady with Eve Arden, and Powder Town. When the play was filmed in 1944, O'Brien reprised his stage performance, co-starring with Judy Holliday. In May 1942, Universal bought out his contract with RKO so he could appear opposite Deanna Durbin in The Amazing Mrs. He toured in the production for two years, appearing alongside a young Mario Lanza. In 1948, O'Brien signed a long-term contract with Warner Bros., who cast him in the screen version of Lillian Hellman's Another Part of the Forest. This starred Fredric March, who also appeared with O'Brien in An Act of Murder (1948). He was then cast as the undercover police officer in White Heat (1949) opposite James Cagney. "He [Cagney] said he had only one rule," O'Brien noted. "He would tap his heart and he would say, "Play it from here, kid." He always did and I believe it's the best rule for any performer. He could play a scene 90 ways and never repeat himself. I try to do this whenever possible." In 1949, 3,147 members of the Young Women's League of America, a national charitable organisation of spinsters, voted that O'Brien had more "male magnetism" than any other man in America today. "All women adore ruggedness," said organisation President Shirley Connolly. "Edmund O'Brien's magnetic appearance and personality most fully stir women's imaginative impulses. We're all agreed that he has more male magnetism than any of the 60,000,000 men in the United States today. According to TCM, "In the early '50s, O'Brien started struggling with his weight, which could change significantly between films. (Runners up were Ezio Pinza, William O'Dwyer and Doak Walker.) Following an appearance in Backfire (shot in 1948 but not released until 1950), his contract with Warner Bros. O'Brien then made one of his most famous movies, D. A., where he plays a man investigating his own murder. He had no problems if that relegated him to character roles, but for a few years, "it was hard to come by anything really first rate." "The funny thing about Hollywood is that they are interested in having you do one thing and do it well and do it ever after," said O'Brien. "That's the sad thing about being a leading man – while the rewards may be great in fame and finances, it becomes monotonous for an actor. O'Brien worked heavily in television, on such shows as Pulitzer Prize Playhouse, Lux Video Theatre and Schlitz Playhouse of Stars. O'Brien appeared extensively in television, including the 1957 live 90-minute broadcast on Playhouse 90 of The Comedian, a drama written by Rod Serling and directed by John Frankenheimer in which Mickey Rooney portrayed a television comedian while O'Brien played a writer driven to the brink of insanity. But you just put a gun in your hands and run through the streets during cops and robbers and you're all set." O'Brien had roles on many television series, including an appearance on Target: The Corruptors! I think that's why some of the people who are continually playing themselves are not happy." He made some notable movies including two for Ida Lupino, The Hitch-Hiker and The Bigamist. In 1958 he directed and starred in a TV drama written by his brother, "The Town That Slept With the Lights On", about two Lancaster murders that so frightened the community that residents began sleeping with their lights on. good picture, good cast, but no good at the box office . , The Eleventh Hour, Breaking Point and Mission: Impossible. From 1959–60 O'Brien portrayed the title role in the syndicated crime drama Johnny Midnight, about a New York City actor-turned-private detective. I tried non-crime films like Another Part of the Forest . O'Brien walked off the set of The Last Voyage in protest at safety issues during the shoot. The producers refused to cast him unless he shed at least 50 pounds, so he went on a crash vegetarian diet and quit drinking. He later came back and found out he had been written out of the film. "I seldom get very far away from crime," he recalled. He was cast as a reporter in Lawrence of Arabia (1962), but had a heart attack during filming and was replaced by Arthur Kennedy. O'Brien recovered to direct his first feature Man-Trap (1961) and appeared opposite Henry Fonda in The Longest Day (1962). He continued to receive good roles: The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962) and The Birdman of Alcatraz (1962). In the mid-'60s O'Brien co-starred with Roger Mobley and Harvey Korman in the "Gallegher" episodes of NBC's Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color. From 1963–65 he co-starred in the NBC legal drama Sam Benedict. O'Brien had a choice role in Seven Days in May (1964) which saw him receive a second Oscar nomination. "I've never made any kind of personality success," he admitted in a 1963 interview. "People never say 'that's an Eddie O'Brien part.' They say, 'That's a part Eddie O'Brien can play.' " ""I'd like to be able to say something important," he added. "To say something to people about their relationship with each other. If it touches just one guy, helps illustrate some points of view about living, then you've accomplished something." O'Brien worked steadily throughout the late 1960s and early 1970s. However his memory problems were beginning to take their toll. A heart attack meant he had to drop out of The Glass Bottom Boat (1966). "It would be awfully hard to do a series again," he said in a 1971 interview. They don't have much of a chance against the movies." His last works, both in 1974, were an episode of the television series Police Story and main role in the film 99 and 44/100% Dead. In 1957 O'Brien recorded a spoken-word album of The Red Badge of Courage (Caedmon TC 1040). Billboard said, "Edmond O'Brien brings intensity in the narrative portions and successfully impersonates the varied characters in dialog." In the late 1970s, O'Brien fell ill with Alzheimer's disease. We didn't know, because for years he'd been sleeping with all his clothes on. In a 1983 interview, his daughter Maria remembers seeing her father in a straitjacket at a Veterans' Hospital: "He was screaming. We saw him a little later and he was walking around like all the other lost souls there." For his contribution to the motion picture industry, Edmond O'Brien has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1725 Vine Street, and a second star at 6523 Hollywood Blvd.

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