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Is smoking weed while pregnant bad for you

A growing number of women report using marijuana during their pregnancy. Many of them report smoking marijuana while pregnant in an attempt to combat severe morning sickness. (There's no medical evidence it does, and OBGYNs don't recommend it.) But is smoking marijuana while pregnant worth the risk? What you eat, smoke and drink during pregnancy and after birth passes to your baby through your placenta and breastmilk. The chemical THC, found in marijuana, also crosses the placenta from the mother to the baby's bloodstream. With marijuana use in pregnancy, your baby may also be more likely to have: There may also be a higher risk of some birth defects, stillbirth or miscarriage, premature birth and admission to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Smoking marijuana while pregnant does have health effects on your baby. A study in the Journal of the American Medical Association reviewing more than 660,000 pregnancies found the rate of preterm birth among reported cannabis users was significantly higher than nonusers - about 12%. "There's a common misconception that because [marijuana] is a plant, it's safe," said Dr. Growing research is showing that THC may change the way your baby's brain grows and develops. In fact, the Surgeon General issued a health advisory on marijuana use among pregnant women. "No amount of marijuana use during pregnancy or adolescence is known to be safe," the Surgeon General's advisory on marijuana use during pregnancy says. "Until and unless more is known about the long-term impact, the safest choice for pregnant women and adolescents is not to use marijuana." (You can read the full advisory here.) "Years of research have proven that alcohol prevents normal development and growth of babies' brains," said Pamela Lynch, MD, who practices family medicine/obstetrics at Franciscan Physician Network Mooresville Family Care. "This was the #1 cause of development delays in children until we had enough proof to convince moms that they were permanently harming their children. You don't want your child to be part of the data showing the negative effects of marijuana in 20 years." Children who have been exposed to marijuana may demonstrate lower levels of: Smoking marijuana while pregnant also exposes your baby to carbon monoxide (5 times more than with cigarettes), which lowers the amount of oxygen available in the baby's bloodstream. Second-hand smoke from marijuana may also impact your baby's long-term health. Medical marijuana is not regulated or approved by the Food and Drug Administration nor is it recommended by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Talk to your prenatal care provider about safer options if you are pregnant and are considering smoking marijuana to help morning sickness or if you use marijuana for medical or recreational purposes. Any marijuana use can affect your ability to think clearly, stay alert, make good decisions and respond to the needs of your baby. Marijuana use includes: Using marijuana can alter your judgment and put you at a higher risk for dizziness, putting you at risk of injury and falls, which can be harmful for the mother and baby. Other health risks of smoking marijuana include: Cannabis use disorder may be diagnosed when a person has more than one sign of problem use -- such as strong cravings to take the drug, withdrawal symptoms, and continuing to use it even when it's causing problems at work or in relationships. Based on medical records, few pregnant women in the study had a marijuana use disorder. But the rate increased over time -- from just under 3 per 1,000 in 2001, to almost 7 per 1,000 in 2012. Babies born to moms with cannabis use disorder were more likely to be born early and underweight, versus babies whose mothers did not have the disorder but were similar in terms of race, education and overall health. They were 6% more likely to be born preterm and 13% more likely to be either underweight or small for gestational age -- a sign of growth restriction in the womb. And while few babies died during the first year of life -- fewer than 1% -- those whose moms used marijuana heavily had a 35% higher risk. Smoking marijuana while breastfeeding is not safe for your baby. THC builds up in breast milk as much as 8 times higher than in a mother's bloodstream. THC is then absorbed into a baby's bloodstream and can be stored in a baby's fat tissue for weeks to months. THC also gets into a baby's brain and can make a baby extra sleepy and not feed very well. Marijuana has also been shown to contain other dangerous substances, including toxins from pesticides, herbicides and fertilizers. These chemicals can also transfer through the breast milk. People often believe that "edibles" are a safer way to consume marijuana. But while there's no smoking involved, Volkow said edibles have their problems. "It takes longer for the effects of edibles to emerge, so people may keep taking more," she said. National Institute on Drug Abuse study found that between 20, the number of U. pregnant women who said they'd used marijuana in the past month doubled -- from about 3.5% to 7%. They can end up consuming a THC dose large enough to land them in the emergency room. Of women who use pot during pregnancy, 80% also smoke cigarettes. The new study, published April 22 in the journal was large, looking at data from 4.8 million births in California. That gave the researchers a chance to zero in on women who used marijuana regularly but not tobacco. Franciscan Health offers a variety of programs to help with those wanting to stop marijuana use. Services include comprehensive assessment, individual and group therapy, and Intensive Outpatient Program, depending on your goals and current needs. For 24 hour or emergency assistance, call the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Association (SAMHSA) National Helpline at 1-800-662-HELP (4357). A growing number of women report using marijuana during their pregnancy. Many of them report smoking marijuana while pregnant in an attempt to combat severe morning sickness. (There's no medical evidence it does, and OBGYNs don't recommend it.) But is smoking marijuana while pregnant worth the risk? What you eat, smoke and drink during pregnancy and after birth passes to your baby through your placenta and breastmilk. The chemical THC, found in marijuana, also crosses the placenta from the mother to the baby's bloodstream. With marijuana use in pregnancy, your baby may also be more likely to have: There may also be a higher risk of some birth defects, stillbirth or miscarriage, premature birth and admission to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Smoking marijuana while pregnant does have health effects on your baby. A study in the Journal of the American Medical Association reviewing more than 660,000 pregnancies found the rate of preterm birth among reported cannabis users was significantly higher than nonusers - about 12%. "There's a common misconception that because [marijuana] is a plant, it's safe," said Dr. Growing research is showing that THC may change the way your baby's brain grows and develops. In fact, the Surgeon General issued a health advisory on marijuana use among pregnant women. "No amount of marijuana use during pregnancy or adolescence is known to be safe," the Surgeon General's advisory on marijuana use during pregnancy says. "Until and unless more is known about the long-term impact, the safest choice for pregnant women and adolescents is not to use marijuana." (You can read the full advisory here.) "Years of research have proven that alcohol prevents normal development and growth of babies' brains," said Pamela Lynch, MD, who practices family medicine/obstetrics at Franciscan Physician Network Mooresville Family Care. "This was the #1 cause of development delays in children until we had enough proof to convince moms that they were permanently harming their children. You don't want your child to be part of the data showing the negative effects of marijuana in 20 years." Children who have been exposed to marijuana may demonstrate lower levels of: Smoking marijuana while pregnant also exposes your baby to carbon monoxide (5 times more than with cigarettes), which lowers the amount of oxygen available in the baby's bloodstream. Second-hand smoke from marijuana may also impact your baby's long-term health. Medical marijuana is not regulated or approved by the Food and Drug Administration nor is it recommended by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Talk to your prenatal care provider about safer options if you are pregnant and are considering smoking marijuana to help morning sickness or if you use marijuana for medical or recreational purposes. Any marijuana use can affect your ability to think clearly, stay alert, make good decisions and respond to the needs of your baby. Marijuana use includes: Using marijuana can alter your judgment and put you at a higher risk for dizziness, putting you at risk of injury and falls, which can be harmful for the mother and baby. Other health risks of smoking marijuana include: Cannabis use disorder may be diagnosed when a person has more than one sign of problem use -- such as strong cravings to take the drug, withdrawal symptoms, and continuing to use it even when it's causing problems at work or in relationships. Based on medical records, few pregnant women in the study had a marijuana use disorder. But the rate increased over time -- from just under 3 per 1,000 in 2001, to almost 7 per 1,000 in 2012. Babies born to moms with cannabis use disorder were more likely to be born early and underweight, versus babies whose mothers did not have the disorder but were similar in terms of race, education and overall health. They were 6% more likely to be born preterm and 13% more likely to be either underweight or small for gestational age -- a sign of growth restriction in the womb. And while few babies died during the first year of life -- fewer than 1% -- those whose moms used marijuana heavily had a 35% higher risk. Smoking marijuana while breastfeeding is not safe for your baby. THC builds up in breast milk as much as 8 times higher than in a mother's bloodstream. THC is then absorbed into a baby's bloodstream and can be stored in a baby's fat tissue for weeks to months. THC also gets into a baby's brain and can make a baby extra sleepy and not feed very well. Marijuana has also been shown to contain other dangerous substances, including toxins from pesticides, herbicides and fertilizers. These chemicals can also transfer through the breast milk. People often believe that "edibles" are a safer way to consume marijuana. But while there's no smoking involved, Volkow said edibles have their problems. "It takes longer for the effects of edibles to emerge, so people may keep taking more," she said. National Institute on Drug Abuse study found that between 20, the number of U. pregnant women who said they'd used marijuana in the past month doubled -- from about 3.5% to 7%. They can end up consuming a THC dose large enough to land them in the emergency room. Of women who use pot during pregnancy, 80% also smoke cigarettes. The new study, published April 22 in the journal was large, looking at data from 4.8 million births in California. That gave the researchers a chance to zero in on women who used marijuana regularly but not tobacco. Franciscan Health offers a variety of programs to help with those wanting to stop marijuana use. Services include comprehensive assessment, individual and group therapy, and Intensive Outpatient Program, depending on your goals and current needs. For 24 hour or emergency assistance, call the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Association (SAMHSA) National Helpline at 1-800-662-HELP (4357).

date: 25-Aug-2021 22:00next


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